Jul 19

Selecting Vocational Trade Schools in Your Neighborhood

Vocational trades’ schools have become very valuable nowadays. More and more people seem to prefer them to taking four-year degree courses. Most businesses and companies today have increasingly relied on vocational trade schools to provide them with a workforce with the special skills that their business need. Most businesses today consider having an employee with vocational training to handle specialized jobs that not everyone are qualified to handle.

If you plan to enter a vocational trade school in your area, you should be able to make sure of what type of profession you want to get into. Different vocational trade schools offer different training modules aimed to prepare and arm a student with a special set of skills for a certain kind of profession. After you do, you also need to check out the vocational trade schools that you wish to enroll in.

Before you decide on one vocational trade school to enroll in try to compare programs that the different schools in your area offer. Get the information that you need from these various schools and learn what they have to offer. Try to find out as much as you can about the facilities of the different vocational trade schools and see if they are adequate enough to answer their students’ needs.

Ask about the types of equipment such as computers and tools that they have that are used for training. Learn about the supplies and tools that the students themselves must provide during the course of the training. Try to visit the school when you can to see firsthand the condition of the classrooms and workshops used by the students.

If you are concerned about the quality of training given at the different vocational trade schools in your area, get some idea of the program’s success rate for each of the school. Ask what percentage of students is able to complete the program. A school with a high dropout rate could mean that students may not like the program or the training being given. Try also to know if training credits earned are transferable to other schools or colleges.

This might prove useful in case you wish to pursue your education later on. Knowing that your training has transferable credits, you may be able to lessen your time spent on advancing your future studies. If most of the reputable schools and colleges in your area say they don’t, it may be a sign that the vocational school in question is not well regarded by the other institutions.

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Jul 13

Tips to Encourage Your Child for Preschool

Is your child ready for preschool? If your child has been attending daycare, you may think that he or she will automatically be ready for the preschool environment; however this may not always be the case. Here are some ways that you can help prepare your child for preschool.

Encourage your child to spend time with others

Before you can expect your child to play with other children, you must first expose him or her to other playmates. This is the best training to introduce your child to concepts such as sharing and taking turns.

Many preschoolers are isolated from other children and this can make integration into the preschool more traumatic. By simply arranging for your child to have play dates with friends, or by enrolling him or her in a social gathering, you can ensure that your child will have the exposure needed to feel confident in a social setting.

Acknowledge your child’s fears

It is very important that if your child tells you that he or she is fearful about starting preschool, that you acknowledge their fears and don’t dismiss them. Many times, well-meaning parents shrug off their children’s fears and in turn reply with upbeat and positive replies.

However, it is crucial to your child’s emotional development that they express their fears and insecurities and feel that they are acknowledged. To help them overcome their nervousness, try watching a video together that pertains to starting school, or even read a book together that discusses it.

The Franklin series, by Paulette Bourgeois, has a great book called, “Franklin goes to School”. You can also browse for more titles at your local library.

By taking the time to prepare your child, instilling routines or rituals, and planning on more activities for your child that involve other children, you can ensure that your little one will be well prepared when it is time for him or her to start preschool.

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Jul 06

Classroom Management Tips To Bring Order to the Class

Classroom ManagementMany teacher or counselor are looking for good discipline methods that will cause the appropriate behavior in their classroom. Unfortunately the discipline and consequences are often not enough.

Children and youth often cannot do specific behaviors that they were never taught. Further, those youngsters who have bad attitudes and no motivation may have no interest in performing to your satisfaction. Yet, teaching students to have the desired skills, motivation and attitude is almost universally over-looked at most sites. Here are some of the essential elements that must preface or accompany in your discipline and consequences:

Skills

Years ago, families taught their offspring the basic skills required in school and other settings. Now, many students have never been taught the necessary nuts-and-bolts behaviors that are essential to functioning. They may see bad behavior at home and bring it with them to your site. That’s why many youth seem to have no sense of acceptable anger control, verbiage, or personal space and distance. Set up any discipline and consequences you want, but if the child lacks the key skills to comply, discipline can’t make much difference.

Motivation

If a child believes that your service is unimportant, their behavior is likely to reflect that belief. Children once learned at home about the value of school or your service. If contemporary students don’t learn that at home, and you don’t teach it at your site, the child’s behavior may reflect their contempt despite any disciplinary efforts.

Attitude

If a child has a negative attitude about your site, that’s likely to be reflected in problematic conduct. Discipline usually can’t compel a child to change, but adjusting the child’s attitude to be more positive, can create results that by comparison, seem almost magical.

Discipline, teaching the skills, attitudes and motivation

Stop looking for the right consequence or discipline structure, and focus on building skills, motivation and attitude. All the consequences in the world can’t compel a child to do behavior they lack the skills, attitude and motivation to do. But skills may be the most important of the three. There are so many skills to teach, here’s a few to start with:

Show up

You work no magic on an absent student. Attendance may be the single most important skill that most schools and agencies never teach. Worse, if a student doesn’t show up, and is suspended, does that assist the child to improve their attendance? What works infinitely better: Teach the child the attendance skills they need, and then perhaps they’ll have the skills to improve. Without skills, suspension or other discipline can’t overcome the fact that the child hasn’t set their alarm, or doesn’t know where their bus pass is.

Listen up

If you can’t communicate with the child, how can you provide your service? Teaching children to have “ears on teacher” (or counselor, foster parent, etc.) is a basic concept that many sites have forgotten to teach children. Discipline can’t turn back the clock and compensate for the reality that the child never heard you in the first place.

Look up

If the eyes are elsewhere, you may find it hard to communicate. “Eyes on teacher” should be universally taught, but is not. If the eyes aren’t tracking, sanctions won’t remedy that on-going gap in skills, but skill-building can.

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Jun 29

Distance Learning Education

Distance Learning EducationChances are you know someone who is working toward a college or post-college degree via the Internet. Perhaps you yourself have attended online classes to continue your education, obtain a certification, or to improve your chances for advancement in your job.

More and more people are finding they can earn their degree from an accredited online university which offers the same challenge and quality of a traditional classroom in an environment which allows them to fit education into a life that might be too busy for a more conventional method of instruction.

Distance education is defined as education or training courses delivered to a remote (off-campus) location via audio, video, or computer technologies. Courses conducted exclusively on campus, as well as classes conducted exclusively via written correspondence, are not included in this definition of distance.

It is increasingly clear that technology has expanded the ability of students to participate in postsecondary education. Virtually every type of learner can benefit from some form of online education. In addition to the rapid proliferation of new courses and programs, colleges and universities are taking advantage of the Internet to enhance the admissions process and give potential students the opportunity to apply online.

Online education enables you to learn without causing a major upheaval in your life. You can access online class rooms using any Internet connection, anytime and practically anywhere. This round-the-clock access allows you to download assignments, read and participate in class discussions, review faculty feedback, and much more, all at times which are convenient to your professional and personal schedule. Many students find that this added flexibility, which does not sacrifice quality, helps keep them on track toward their goals more readily than with the rigid scheduling of a traditional learning environment.

There is also evidence that a portion of those students who participate in postsecondary education in their homes or workplace would not otherwise enroll in postsecondary education. Thus, it appears that technology is opening up new markets of potential students without significantly diminishing the number of students who would enroll in traditional colleges and universities, many of which also are offering technology-mediated distance education.

Distance learners are also generally happy with their online learning experience. A large-scale national study of student participation in distance education addressed student satisfaction of distance education classes and, when asked how satisfied they were with their distance education classes compared to their regular classes, a majority of both undergraduate and graduate students were at least as satisfied or more satisfied with the quality of teaching in their distance education classes compared with their regular classes.

Perhaps it is time to focus attention on the more basic question of how students learn, regardless of the delivery system. Technology-mediated distance learning is evolving so quickly it’s difficult for education experts to set standards that adequately address the current status and the future potential of the online learning experience.

Because experimental studies comparing distance education courses with campus-based courses have been based upon the premise that campus-based courses are the “gold standard,” which may be open to question, it may be advisable to abandon these studies. It appears that addressing how students learn and focusing on outcomes assessment would be more productive.

Several organizations have developed standards and guidelines to ensure quality distance education, including the Southern Regional Electronic Campus, the National Education Association, and the Western Cooperative for Educational Telecommunications. These guidelines cover areas such as course development, evaluation and assessment, faculty support, and institutional support.

Among the benchmarks, interactivity–between student and faculty, student and student, and student and information–is the single most essential element for effectiveness in distance education.

It is clear that online learning and distance education are here to stay. The benefits are compelling, especially to those who have succeeded in completing their education or adding a much needed certification to their credentials through an online educational experience.

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